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ibusinesslines.com November 15, 2018


Britain to ask Russia to extradite suspects in Salisbury attack

09 August 2018, 05:24 | Erica Roy

Britain to ask Russia to extradite suspects in Salisbury attack

Police officers stand on duty outside Sergei Skripal's home in Salisbury Britain

The Guardian reports that Britain wants Russian Federation to extradite two men over the Skripal nerve-agent case.

We will remind that not so long ago, the investigators on the case about poisoning of the former GRU officer Sergei Skripal and his daughter Julia in British Salisbury showed key witnesses a photo of a possible suspect.

United Kingdom intelligence chiefs blamed Russian Federation for the attack, but Moscow denies all responsibility. "They were found unconscious on a bench in a shopping centre after being exposed to novichok", the news agency reads.

The Guardian newspaper, citing unnamed government and security sources, said state prosecutors had prepared the extradition request and were ready to file it to Moscow.

Any extradition request is likely to be rejected by Russian Federation - and risks inflaming diplomatic tensions between London and Moscow, which are the worst since the Cold War.


The government has been consistent in pointing the finger of blame at Moscow for the poisoning using Novichok - a military-grade nerve agent developed by the former Soviet Union.

The Times reports said that an extradition application would reignite a diplomatic row with the Russian government who have denied any state involvement in the novichok attack in Salisbury.

The Skripals were hospitalized for months in critical condition, but after what they described as a painful period of recovery, both were released.

In 2007, Putin rejected a similar extradition request for two Russians tied to the high-profile 2006 assassination of former FSB officer Alexander Litvinenko. Mr Rowley recovered but Ms Sturgess died last month.

Police have said they believe the two incidents are related, theorizing that perpetrators first smeared the Novichok on the door of Sergei Skripal's house and discarded the container, which Rowley later picked up and gave to Sturgess, who sprayed it on her wrists.



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