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ibusinesslines.com October 22, 2018


Family warns of ‘Hot Water Challenge’ danger after teen suffers severe burns

31 July 2018, 07:59 | Melissa Porter

Family warns of ‘Hot Water Challenge’ danger after teen suffers severe burns

Family warns of ‘Hot Water Challenge’ danger after teen suffers severe burns

An Indiana teen suffered second degree burns after participating in a very unsafe and foolish online social media challenge.

Kyland Clark said, "There's a limit to what you should do in a challenge and what you shouldn't do".

The 15-year-old says he ran to a bathroom to try and escape the pain.

A teen in Indianapolis, Indiana, says he suffered second-degree burns to his face and body after friends poured boiling water on him as part of the "Hot Water Challenge" that's gone viral on YouTube and elsewhere. "I looked down at my chest and my skin just fell off my chest and then I went and looked in a mirror and I had skin falling off right here and on my face".

Kyland and his mother are now issuing a warning about how unsafe the challenge is.

A fifteen-year-old in Indianapolis, Indiana, suffered painful injuries after his alleged friend poured scalding hot water on him while he slept as a part of the "hot water challenge".

If hot coffee or tea can cause an injury, imagine what boiling water can do, according to the Burn Foundation.


The teen was admitted to a local hospital, where he remained under treatment for a week. It also involves people posting to social media videos of themselves performing the challenge on an unsuspecting person. Her mother then called 911.

He says that he and his friend looked up the challenge on the internet and made a decision to participate.

"It's suggesting to people that they can try it and they won't be hurt, but they will be".

Kyland and his mother also want to make it known how risky the challenge is.

Doctors said they are hopeful that Clark's injuries won't be permanent.

In Florida, a variation of the challenge tragically killed an 8-year-old girl last summer after she attempted to drink boiling hot water through a straw. Thoughts echoed by Kyland and Andrea Clark, who say, for now, they're just glad Kyland is on the road to recovery. "Don't take it overboard", Kyland said.



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