ibusinesslines.com
ibusinesslines.com August 19, 2018


Tennessee attorney general sues opioid manufacturer for role in deadly epidemic

16 May 2018, 06:43 | Erica Roy

Attorney General Wayne Stenehjem announces lawsuit against opioid manufacturer in Fargo

Attorney General Wayne Stenehjem announces lawsuit against opioid manufacturer in Fargo

"Three Tennesseans are dying each day from opioid-related overdoses, and we are committed to the hard work that needs to be done to address this tragedy".

"Today, I filed a lawsuit against Purdue Pharma". In the course of the investigation, Stenehjem said he concluded that Purdue Pharma is in large part responsible for fueling the opioid epidemic.

Laxalt's lawsuit seeks civil penalties and damages for reimbursement and treatment, and seeks to cease Purdue's unlawful promotion of opioids on behalf of the State as a whole and the municipalities and counties. Attorney General Wayne Stenehjem says he has filed a lawsuit against Purdue Pharma. "Since the release of OxyContin, Purdue has engaged in an extensive, well-crafted and highly targeted deceptive marketing campaign to spread false and misleading messages to health care professionals and patients in Nevada".


"My office is holding Purdue Pharma accountable for fueling the nation's opioid epidemic by deceptive marketing of its prescription opioid painkillers", Texas Attorney General ken Paxton said.

Connecticut-based Purdue denied the claims in an email statement that said it will defend itself. However, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) noted in its 2016 guidelines that "there is no good evidence that opioids improve pain or function with long-term use". If necessary, and depending on how the settlement discussions progress, North Dakota will amend its complaint to include additional manufacturers or bring separate suits against other manufacturers or distributors, according to Stenehjem.

The state's original lawsuit, which was filed in Knox County Circuit Court past year, alleges Purdue violated the Tennessee Consumer Protection Act, as well as a 2007 settlement made with the state of Tennessee and, "created a statewide public nuisance by interfering with the health of Tennesseans and the commercial marketplace". The cases have been consolidated before a federal judge in Ohio.



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