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ibusinesslines.com July 18, 2018


Qualcomm files lawsuits in China to ban iPhones

14 October 2017, 12:44 | Jodi Jackson

Qualcomm files lawsuits in China to ban iPhones

Qualcomm files lawsuits in China to ban iPhones

Apple's ongoing legal battle with Qualcomm is heating up today in a serious way. This is the latest strike in a legal war between the two companies, which started out in the U.S. and has since expanded worldwide. The inventions "are a few examples of the many Qualcomm technologies that Apple uses to improve its devices and increase its profits", Trimble claims. Apple has accused Qualcomm of failing to pay it $1 billion in rebates that it says it is owed.

Update: Qualcomm's suits pertain to three non-standard essential patents and the claims were filed in a Beijing court on September 29.

Apple, of course, says the claims by Qualcomm have no merit.


Although Apple doesn't use Snapdragon processors in its iPhones, it's still on the hook for numerous patents Qualcomm owns.

"Like their other courtroom maneuvers, we believe this latest legal effort will fail", Apple's spokesperson said. Qualcomm charges a percentage of the price of each handset regardless of whether it includes a chip from the company, and Apple is sick of paying those fees. The Greater China region accounted for 22.5 percent of Apple's $215.6 billion sales in its most recent financial year. Having to compensate for the lost sales and cheap labor would be a big blow to Apple, and according to Walkley, a decision in Qualcomm's favor could fuel layoffs at major manufacturing companies. It's been repeatedly fined for similar behaviors, with the latest ruling coming down yesterday, when it was fined $774 million by Taiwan's Fair Trade Commission. All we know right now is that this legal fight won't end anytime soon.



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