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ibusinesslines.com May 23, 2018


Patriots call out New York Times over White House visit comparisons

21 April 2017, 03:15 | Kelvin Horton

Patriots call out New York Times over White House visit comparisons

Patriots call out New York Times over White House visit comparisons

As we can see above, a similar pattern emerged in 2004 and 2005 when substantially fewer players showed up to the White House as compared to the 2002 visit following the franchise's first Super Bowl win.

The New England Patriots are taking issue with a New York Times photo comparison that suggested a significantly smaller turnout for a Super Bowl celebration at the White House with President Donald Trump than one two years ago with President Barack Obama.

On Wednesday, the Patriots were missing several faces for several reasons. The photo makes it clear there are more people in 2015 than on Wednesday. On Wednesday, they were seated on the South Lawn.

Given the Patriots incredible run of success, they thought it might be better to compare the times that they have won two Super Bowls in three years and then visited the White House.

During his campaign Trump mentioned the fact that he and Brady are friends every time he passed through New England, and on numerous occasions he's called Brady the greatest quarterback who's ever lived.


Roughly a half-dozen players had previously said they planned to skip this week's White House visit due to Trump's politics. Of course, he stayed home in 2015 as well, so who knows with that guy.

The Patriots later said that the photos shown were misleading, and took to Twitter to explain the difference in the two photos.

The New England Patriots' rivalry with NY has spilled into politics.

Disagreement over the pictures aside, there were indeed fewer Patriots players in attendance at Wednesday's meeting than there were in 2015.

Although both business and consumer confidence appear to be up this year, a review of the evening news shows on ABC, CBS, and NBC (assuming that programming is still relevant) conducted by the Media Research Center, a conservative watchdog group, claims that 89 percent of its coverage about President Trump has been negative. The Patriots organization told the Times that despite the lower number of players present, the size of the overall delegation that went to the White House is about the same as it was two years ago.



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